WHAT WE CAN DO TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE

The effects of climate change have worsened. Sea levels are rising faster than anticipated, methane leaks and emissions are out of control (with little to no regulation of the emitters), the Earth is warming at a rate expected to exceed the 2 degrees Celsius that is the goal of COP21 to prevent catastrophe, and vicious storms, floods, and droughts are increasingly common. “Global Weirding” is a new term for the weirdness that is happening to the Earth due to climate change.

We need to take action, and fast. We at DWWC believe these are the most important steps individuals can take:

1) Cut down on (or cut out) animal products in our diets, particularly beef and dairy. Watch Cowspiracy and you’ll understand why.

2) Cut down on CO2 emissions caused by transportation. If possible, buy or lease an electric car. Or, drive a hybrid or other fuel efficient car, and drive less. Hats off to those who ride bikes, take the bus, and walk rather than drive. Low gas prices have caused Americans to drive more, which is a tragedy. No matter what gas costs, we must cut back.

3) Go solar for your home or business. It is imperative that all nations move as fast as possible to cut the use of fossil fuels, or we may not live to regret it.

4) Support the Clean Power Plan. It’s essential to meet the goals of COP21.

5) Work to elect government representatives who will fight climate change. We need governments to develop policies that will move us to sustainable energy immediately.

6) Spread the word. Doing What We Can offers presentations on climate change and related topics that are free to the public. Contact us at 208-484-3241.

Dr. James Hansen

“If humanity wishes to preserve a planet similar to that on which civilization developed and to which life on Earth is adapted, paleoclimate evidence and ongoing climate change suggest that CO2 will need to be reduced from [current levels] to at most 350 ppm.”

Dr. James Hansen
from the website 350.org

LIVING LIKE AN AMERICAN

“We Americans are in no position to lecture anyone [about climate change]. But we are in a position to know better. We are in a position to set a different example of growth. We are in a position to use our resources and know-how to invent the renewable, clean power sources and energy efficiency systems that can make growth greener. Both Europe and Japan have demonstrated that it is possible to live a middle-class lifestyle with much less consumption. In a world that is both flat and crowded, if we, as Americans, do not redefine what an American middle-class lifestyle is–and invent the tools and spread the know-how that enable another two or three billion people to enjoy it in a more sustainable fashion–we will need to colonize three more planets. Because we are going to make planet earth so hot, and strip it so bare of resources, that nobody, including us, will be able to live like Americans one day.” —  Thomas L. Friedman, Hot, Flat, and Crowded, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York (2008), at p.55.

MAN’S INHUMANITY TO NATURE

“They paved paradise and put up a parking lot … They took all the trees and put ’em in a tree museum / and charged people a dollar and a half just to see ’em.” — singer/songwriter Joni Mitchell, from “Big Yellow Taxi,” in the album “Ladies of the Canyon,” originally written and sung by Ms. Mitchell in 1970

IMPORTANCE AND VULNERABILITY OF NATURE

“Too many critics of environmentalism characterize any conservation  as some flaky anticapitalist ideological dalliance. They fail to recognize how important nature–clean water, clean air, healthy forests, healthy oceans, and species diversity–is to our daily life and our spiritual well-being, not to mention our economy, and how vulnerable it is to destruction.” — Thomas Friedman, Hot, Flat and Crowded, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York (2008), at p. 194.

Doing A Little

“If all the ineffective ideas for solving the energy crisis were laid end to end, they would reach the moon and back. … [I]f everyone does a little, we’ll achieve only a little.”  — David JC MacKay, Sustainable Energy – Without the Hot Air, (Cambridge, England) (2009), at p. 3.